DotNet FrameWork – What is GUID(Globally Unique Identifier) , why we use it and where – Day 13 of 30

GUID :– GUID is Short form of Globally Unique Identifier, a unique 128-bit number that is produced by the Windows OS or by some Windows applications to identify a particular component, application, file, database entry, and/or user. For instance, a Web site may generate a GUID and assign it to a user’s browser to record and track the session. A GUID is also used in a Windows registry to identify COM DLLs. Knowing where to look in the registry and having the correct GUID yields a lot information about a COM object (i.e., information in the type library, its physical location, etc.). Windows also identifies user accounts by a username (computer/domain and username) and assigns it a GUID. Some database administrators even will use GUIDs as primary key values in databases.

GUIDs can be created in a number of ways, but usually they are a combination of a few unique settings based on specific point in time (e.g., an IP address, network MAC address, clock date/time, etc.).

What is the difference between inline and code behind – which is best in a loosely coupled solution

ASP.NET supports two modes of page development: Page logic code that is written inside runat=”server”> blocks within an .aspx file and dynamically compiled the first time the page is requested on the server. Page logic code that is written within an external class that is compiled prior to deployment on a server and linked “”behind”” the .aspx file at run time.

Whats MSIL, and why should my developers need an appreciation of it if at all?

When compiling the source code to managed code, the compiler translates the source into Microsoft intermediate language (MSIL). This is a CPU-independent set of instructions that can efficiently be converted to native code. Microsoft intermediate language (MSIL) is a translation used as the output of a number of compilers. It is the input to a just-in-time (JIT) compiler. The Common Language Runtime includes a JIT compiler for the conversion of MSIL to native code.

Before Microsoft Intermediate Language (MSIL) can be executed it, must be converted by the .NET Framework just-in-time (JIT) compiler to native code. This is CPU-specific code that runs on the same computer architecture as the JIT compiler. Rather than using time and memory to convert all of the MSIL in a portable executable (PE) file to native code. It converts the MSIL as needed whilst executing, then caches the resulting native code so its accessible for any subsequent calls.

Please read all the post in the Dotnet Framework series.

Reference : Dilip Kumar Jena ( https://mstechexplore.wordpress.com )

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One thought on “DotNet FrameWork – What is GUID(Globally Unique Identifier) , why we use it and where – Day 13 of 30

  1. Pingback: DotNet FrameWork – Dot Net Basics Complete Series Reference – Day 0 of 30 « Exploring Dot Net with Dilip Kumar Jena

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